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ENFSI 2011 Monopoly Program: Improving Forensic Methodolgies Across Europe (IFMAE)

Andrzej Drygajlo
Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Switzerland
andrzej.drygajlo@epfl.ch

Abstract

2011 Monopoly Program (MP2011) of the European Network of Forensic Science Institutes (ENFSI) entitled “Improving Forensic Methodology across Europe (IFMAE)” concerns broad activities including best practices, validation studies, proficiency tests and collaborative exercises. The validation of forensic methods remains an area where a lot of work needs to be done. This applies across all forensic fields and particularly for comparative biometric methods and techniques. It is a critical element in the mutual recognition of forensic investigative and evaluative results across the European Union (EU). The specific forensic biometrics project in MP2011 entitled “Methodological guidelines for semi-automatic and automatic speaker recognition for case assessment and interpretation”, proposed by the ENFSI Forensic Speech and Audio Analysis Working Group (FSAAWG), is completely aligned with the recent demands from the legal and investigative bodies. Best practice manuals, methodological guidelines, as well as validation and assessment procedures for forensic semi-automatic and automatic speaker recognition have been identified as priorities for any European forensic biometrics laboratory working in the speech and audio analysis field, as well as for the whole law enforcement community. This project aims at developing universal methodology, to be used for any specific data of the case, that provides a coherent way of assessing and presenting recorded speech as scientific evidence and assisting in an investigative capacity of forensic scientists.

Andrzej Drygajlo
Biography

Andrzej Drygajlo, head of the Speech Processing and Biometrics Group (SPBG) at EPFL, he conducts research on technological and methodological aspects of speech and biometrics for security and forensic applications. In 1993 he created the EPFL Speech Processing Group (SPG) and then the EPFL Speech Processing and Biometrics Group (SPBG). Currently he conducts research and teaching in speech processing, biometrics and human-achine communication at EPFL and at the School of Forensic Science at the University of Lausanne.

Dr. Drygajlo has participated in and coordinated numerous national (e.g., Swiss National Science Foundation project "The Challenge of Forensic Speech Processing: Automatic Speaker Recognition for Criminal Investigations" and “Biometric Evidence in Forensic Automatic Speaker Recognition”) and international projects (e.g., BioSecure Network of Excellence, COST IC 1206, IC 1106, 2101, 276, 275, 249, 250) in the domain of speech processing and biometrics. At present, he (EPFL) is the Grant Holder of the European COST IC 1106 Action “Integrating Biometrics and Forensics for the Digital Age”. From 2006 to 2011 he was chairman of the European COST 2101 Action "Biometrics for Identity Documents and Smart Cards". He is also a chairman of the Expert Working Group for Forensic Speech and Audio Analysis (FSAAWG) of the European Network of Forensic Science Institutes (ENFSI). Since 2011 he has led the FSAAWG project “Methodological guidelines for semi-automatic and automatic speaker recognition for case assessment and interpretation” in the framework of the ENFSI Monopoly Programme 2011"Improving Forensic Methodologies across Europe (IFMAE)". In the domain of forensics, he invented with his Ph.D. students some pioneering approaches, among others Bayesian interpretation of evidence in forensic automatic speaker recognition using data-driven methodology. Nowadays, this approach is seen as a current trend of developing new and more reliable methods in forensic automatic speaker recognition (FASR).