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Degree Programme
Q1: What does ICT stand for?
Q2: When will the B.Sc. (Hons.) ICT degree programme start?
Q3: Who is responsible for the management of the ICT degree programme as a whole at the University of Malta?
Q4: Is the B.Sc. (Hons.) ICT degree part of the B.Sc. (Hons.) degree offered by the Faculty of Science at the University of Malta?
Q5: What are the various areas of specialisation one can choose from in the B.Sc. (Hons.) ICT degree?
Q6: Must one necessarily specialise?
Q7: What is meant by "study in a subsidiary area"?
Q8: Is it necessary to choose a subsidiary area of study?
Q9: What happens if I change my mind after starting a given specialization and wish to switch to a different one?
Q10: Why is this a three-year Honours degree programme?

The Faculty of ICT
Q1: When was the Faculty of ICT set-up?
Q2: Which departments make up the Faculty of ICT?
Q3: What level of support should I expect from both tutors and Faculty?
Q4: What profile of tutors should I expect to find within the Faculty of ICT?

Communications and Computer Engineering
Q1: Where does Communications and Computer Engineering fit in to the ICT degree programme?
Q2: What is the difference between the Communications and Computer Engineering area of study within the B.Sc. (Hons) ICT degree programme and the B.Eng. (Hons) degree offered by the Faculty of Engineering?
Q3: What is the Communications and Computer Engineering area of specialisation about?
Q4: What topics are covered within the Communications and Computer and Engineering area of specialisation?

CSAI Specialisation
Q1: Where does Computer Science fit in to ICT degree programme?
Q2: What are the special characteristics of the CSAI specialisation?
Q3: Will choosing the CSAI area exclude me from opportunities in other areas of computing?
Q4: What can I do after completing my University studies with a Computer Science specialisation?

Artificial Intelligence
Q1: What is Artificial Intelligence (AI)?

Computer Science
Q1: In a nutshell, what is Computer Science?
Q2: What general topics form part of Computer Science?
Q3: Can I learn Computer Science in conjunction with other subjects?
Q4: What do I need as preparation before embarking on a Computer Science course?

Computer Information Systems
Q1: How does Informatics fit into the ICT degree programme?
Q2: What is the difference between the Computer Information Systems and similar topics in Computer Science.?
Q3: What is the Informatics area of specialisation about?
Q4: What topics are covered within the Computer Information Systems area of specialisation?
Q5: What degrees are covered within the Computer Information Systems area of Specialisation?

Career Prospects
Q1: What sort of jobs are available for somebody qualified with a B.Sc. (Hons) ICT degree?

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Degree Programme [top]

Q1: What does ICT stand for?
A1: Information and Communication Technology.

Q2: When will the B.Sc. (Hons.) ICT degree programme start?
A2: October 2007.

Q3: Who is responsible for the management of the ICT degree programme as a whole at the University of Malta?
A3: The Faculty of ICT.

Q4: Is the B.Sc. (Hons.) ICT degree part of the B.Sc. (Hons.) degree offered by the Faculty of Science at the University of Malta?
A4: No. The B.Sc. (Hons.) ICT degree is an independent degree programme offered by the Faculty of ICT at the University of Malta.

Q5: What are the various areas of specialisation one can choose from in the B.Sc. (Hons.) ICT degree?
A5: There are three, as follows:
  • Communications & Computer Engineering (CCE);
  • Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence (CSAI);
  • Computer Information Systems (CIS).
Some of these admit the option of study in a subsidiary area.

Q6: Must one necessarily specialise?
A6: No. There is also the option of obtaining a B.Sc. (Hons.) ICT degree with no specialisation. This programme of studies covers all the main areas of ICT.

Q7: What is meant by "study in a subsidiary area"?
A7: A programme of studies consists of a total of 180 credits spread over three years. Some programmes in the B.Sc. (Hons.) ICT cover an area of study (e.g. the programme in Communications and Computer Engineering) with the possibility of choosing electives (options) within the area of study.Other programmes offer a subsidiary area of study that is distinct from, and studied in conjunction with, a main area. Study within such an area is organised as a 36-credit sub-programme (12 per year) of the main programme.

Q8: Is it necessary to choose a subsidiary area of study?
A8: Only if the main area requires it. This is currently the case for CIS. However, other main areas are either not offered with a subsidiary (CCE, ICT) or else leave the choice up to the student (CSAI).

Q9: What happens if I change my mind after starting a given specialization and wish to switch to a different one?
A9: We strongly urge you, and expect you, to inform yourself adequately enough beforehand so as to be able to exercise maturity in your original choice and avoid this question ever arising in the first place. However, early requests of this nature will be treated exceptionally and possibly on an individual basis.

Q10: Why is this a three-year Honours degree programme?
A10: Most European countries have adopted (or are in the process of adopting) a new three-cycle system for their University degree programmes which is part of what is known as the Bologna Process. The First Cycle (normally three years) is the Bachelor Degree. Students may opt to stop here and seek employment. The Second Cycle (normally two years) is the Masters Degree. This is a higher level of qualification which further specialises the student in a given area of study which would lead to a higher level of professional activity. It is expected that many students would proceed to the second cycle programme. The Third Cycle (normally three years) is the Doctoral Degree which would qualify the student for research work. All three cycles will be available within the Faculty of ICT.

 
The Faculty of ICT [top]

Q1: When was the Faculty of ICT set-up?
A1: The Faculty of ICT was formally established in May 2007. Although this is a new Faculty, it builds on the experience gained through more than 10 years of collaboration between three departments within the University working in the area of ICT under the auspices of the Board of Studies for IT which was responsible for the Diploma in IT, the BSc IT (Hons) degree and the Masters in IT conversion postgraduate course.

Q2: Which departments make up the Faculty of ICT?
A2: Five departments, namely of:
  • Communications & Computer Engineering
  • Computer Information Systems
  • Computer Science
  • Intelligent Computer Systems
  • Micro & Nano-Electronics

Q3: What level of support should I expect from both tutors and Faculty?
A3: All departmental and faculty tutors will try to answer any study-related query as well as supervise project effort as allocated. Tutors can be reached at their respective offices, subject to their duties and availability. Setting up of appointments prior to personal visits is strongly advised. All tutors can also be reached via e-mail. The size and nature of e-mail queries is expected to be contained and focused.

Q4: What profile of tutors should I expect to find within the Faculty of ICT?
A4: All our tutors are highly qualified in their respective fields of expertise, and have experience in both academic and industrial/business spheres. Most tutors have Doctorate level degrees, others having Masters level qualifications with aspirations to further their studies.

 
Communications and Computer Engineering [top]

Q1: Where does Communications and Computer Engineering fit in to the ICT degree programme?
A1: Communications and Computer Engineering is an area of study within the B.Sc. (Hons) ICT degree programme. This programme is designed to offer the student a solid foundation in Communications and Computer engineering and with a good grounding in other related areas.

Q2: What is the difference between the Communications and Computer Engineering area of study within the B.Sc. (Hons) ICT degree programme and the B.Eng. (Hons) degree offered by the Faculty of Engineering?
A2: The most obvious difference is that the B.Eng. (Hons) degree is currently a 4-year degree programme, whereas the B.Sc. (Hons) ICT degree is a 3-year programme following the format specified by the Bologna Process and that is most commonly adopted in other European countries. However, more importantly, the B.Sc. (Hons) ICT programme, is the only degree at the University of Malta that enables one to focus on the area of Communications and Computer Engineering. Although it was previously possible to do so within the B.Eng. (Hons) degree programme this is no longer the case as from October 2007.

Q3: What is the Communications and Computer Engineering area of specialisation about?
A3: The Communications and Computer Engineering area focuses on two very important aspects of computing – the efficient, effective and secure transmission of human or machine generated information (including multimedia) from one place to another (or from one computer to another) and the design and building of computational devices both in terms of hardware and software requirements, in all sorts of environments, from complex multi-processor computers to small intelligent embedded devices in everyday appliances. This area of study also includes processing of multimedia signals (text, audio, speech, image, video etc.) for all sorts of applications, such as for example the compression of video so to enable the simultaneous transmission of several TV signals over a telephone line.

Q4: What topics are covered within the Communications and Computer and Engineering area of specialisation?
A4: Very briefly, the following topics will be covered:
  • Computer Programming
  • Digital System Design
  • Computer Architecture and Organisation
  • Embedded Systems
  • VLSI Design and Fabrication
  • Digital Signal Processing
  • Algorithms
  • Multimedia Communications
  • Computer Networks
  • Communication Systems
  • Software Engineering

CSAI Specialisation [top]

Q1: Where does Computer Science fit in to ICT degree programme?
A1: Computer Science is an area of study within the B.Sc. (Hons) ICT degree programme in general. Students wishing to specialise in Computer Science should consider opting for the CSAI area of specialisation.

Q2: What are the special characteristics of the CSAI specialisation?
A2: The CSAI specialisation focuses on two major subtopics which address the theory and practice of Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence respectively.

A3: Will choosing the CSAI area exclude me from opportunities in other areas of computing?
A3: It will obviously mean that you will study less of those other areas. However, the programme has been designed to facilitate reorientation within the general ICT area. However, one should appreciate the fact, that people with specialities which are more targeted at, or focused towards, a particular post, and/or with additional consolidating experience, can be favoured.
 
Q4: What can I do after completing my University studies with a Computer Science specialisation?
A4: Celebrate! Actually, a Computer Science specialisation in an ICT degree remains first-and-foremost an ICT degree. Therefore, there are many ICT-oriented posts which can be equally adequate for graduates from all specialities of the ICT degree. Strict compartmentalization of employment positions as per specialisation in today's interlinked technological market can be misleading or restrictive.

 
AI [top]

Q1: What is Artificial Intelligence (AI)?
A1: AI has the twin goals of (i) developing systems that display something of the natural intelligence we associated with human beings, and (ii) helping us understand the nature of intelligence by developing computational models. AI focuses on principles underlying intelligent systems that can, for example, learn from experience (machine learning), exploit and interpret large-scale data collections such as the Web (search, retrieval), perform formal and informal reasoning (inference), discover implicit patterns in often noisy biological, visual or auditory data (bioinformatics, image and audio processing), exploit the Internet (agent technologies and semantic web), handle natural language (human language technology) and respond adaptively to the user (adaptive systems), for example in the context of e-learning. In short, AI seeks to make computers more natural and more intelligent, both to improve the quality of our lives and to better understand how naturalness and intelligence works in practice.

 
CS [top]

Q1: In a nutshell, what is Computer Science?
A1: The analysis, design, construction, control and communication of algorithms.

Q2: What general topics form part of Computer Science?
A2: It should be noted, that due to the close integration of all ICT areas, some Computer Science topics might share commonalties with other related Computing and Engineering areas, and therefore, would not be exclusive to Computer Science. Some traditional generic Computer Science areas could include the following:
  • Data abstraction, encoding and storage;
  • Operating systems;
  • Formal Methods
  • Networking;
  • Algorithms and algorithm design;
  • Theory of computation;
  • Programming languages;
  • Software Engineering;
  • Database systems;
  • Machine Architecture and machine language;
  • Graphics.

Q3: Can I learn Computer Science in conjunction with other subjects?
A3: Yes. Not only can you, but you should. Computer Science fits in naturally with other computing and engineering disciplines. Furthermore, Computer Science is fundamental enough to be applied to virtually all scientific, as well as several non-scientific, study areas.

Q4: What do I need as preparation before embarking on a Computer Science course?
A4: Preferably, a background in computing and mathematics and a mind that is receptive to new ideas and ways of thinking.


CIS [top]

Q1: How does Informatics fit into the ICT degree programme?
A1: Informatics or Information Systems as it is often known concerns itself with the collection, analysis, transformation, storage and dissemination of information to organizations and businesses. It is an area of study within the B.Sc. (Hons) ICT degree programme.  The syllabus is designed to offer the student a solid foundation in this area of ICT.

Q2: What is the difference between the Computer Information Systems and similar topics in Computer Science.?
A2: The most obvious difference is that Informatics besides the technical aspects of the subject gives particular importance to the people, business and organisational issues of managing information in a way which integrates the IT aspect with the business or service objectives of the organisation.

Q3: What is the Informatics area of specialisation about?
A3: The Informatics or Information Systems area focuses on two very important needs in computing – First the need to manage enterprise data in a corporate database and data warehouse where it can be queried to support organisational decision taking, to provide better customer support and to establish better links with suppliers. Secondly it recognises that information has to be delivered to the end user in multimedia format and at a place and time which best suits the end user.

Q4: What topics are covered within the Computer Information Systems area of specialisation?
A4: Very briefly, the following topics will be covered:
  • Computer Programming;
  • Iformation systems theory;
  • Business and Systems analysis and design especially soft systems approaches;
  • Enterprise wide information resource planning;
  • Databases , data warehousing and data mining;
  • E-Commerce and applied web engineering;
  • Scientific and Geographic Information Systems;
  • Customer relation management ;
  • IT project management.

Q5: What degrees are covered within the Computer Information Systems area of Specialisation?
A5: At present Informatics is offered in conjunction with a subsidiary area which can be chosen from one of the following areas:
  • Mathematics;
  • Communication and Computer Engineering;
  • Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence.

 
Career Prospects [top]

Q1: What sort of jobs are available for somebody qualified with a B.Sc. (Hons) ICT degree?
A1: There are many possibilities, the sky is the limit! Just as an example, ICT-related career opportunities could include the following:
  • Senior software developers and system architects;
  • Tenure-track university positions;
  • Chief technology officers;
  • Research coordinators and senior research officers;
  • Software engineers and development team leaders;
  • Senior system administrators;
  • Enterprise Integration technical infrastructure development and management posts;
  • Business systems coordinators and managers;
  • IT solution consultants;
  • Internet/Web developers, and many others;
  • Telecommunication infrastructure architects;
  • Computer Network Engineers
  • Communication specialists;
  • Microelectronics developers and process managers;
  • Your own "start-up" company;
  • and many others.
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13th Edition of EY’s Annual Attractiveness Event

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The 13th Edition of EY’s Annual Attractiveness event will be held on 25th October 2017 at the InterContinental Hotel,

St. Julians. It is titled "Thinking without the box: disruption, technology and FDI".

 

The  students' invitation and more information can be found here

The conference programme can be found here

 

 
 
Last Updated: 13 September 2011

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