Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.um.edu.mt/library/oar/handle/123456789/40179
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dc.contributor.authorGouder, Caroline-
dc.contributor.authorFsadni, Claudia-
dc.contributor.authorBezzina, Frank-
dc.contributor.authorFsadni, Peter-
dc.contributor.authorMontefort, Stephen-
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-19T13:02:51Z-
dc.date.available2019-02-19T13:02:51Z-
dc.date.issued2019-02-
dc.identifier.citationGouder, C., Fsadni, C., Bezzina, F., Fsadni, P., & Montefort, S. (2019). Indoor climate and its impact on atopic conditions in Maltese school children. Malta Medical Journal, 30(2), 21-28.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.um.edu.mt/library/oar//handle/123456789/40179-
dc.description.abstractSeveral studies on the prevalence of allergic conditions have identified that allergic conditions are on the increase worldwide. The aim of this study was to study the effect of classroom humidity and temperature levels on schoolchildren in Malta. Our cohort included 191 children. Standardised ISAAC health questionnaires were answered by the children’s parents. Lung function tests, acoustic rhinometry, exhaled NO, exhaled CO and nasal lavage were performed on the participating children. School building characteristics were also studied. A significant association was noted between a high relative humidity exposure and nasal cross-sectional areas (p=0.003), and doctor diagnosed allergic rhinitis (p=0.002), indicating the presence of allergic rhinitis, as was increased indoor temperature (p=0.003). Increased indoor temperature was also associated with increased exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) (p<0.001) indicating uncontrolled asthma. In conclusion, increased classroom temperatures and humidity, both linked to decreased classroom ventilation, were associated with increased incidence of allergic conditions in schoolchildren in Malta. These results emphasize the important need for the introduction of climate control and dehumidifying systems in our schools with the aim of decreasing the prevalence and severity of such conditions in this cohort of patients.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherUniversity of Malta. Medical Schoolen_GB
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen_GB
dc.subjectSchool children -- Maltaen_GB
dc.subjectSchool children -- Health and hygieneen_GB
dc.subjectIndoor air quality -- Maltaen_GB
dc.subjectAllergy in children -- Maltaen_GB
dc.titleIndoor climate and its impact on atopic conditions in Maltese school childrenen_GB
dc.typearticleen_GB
dc.rights.holderThe copyright of this work belongs to the author(s)/publisher. The rights of this work are as defined by the appropriate Copyright Legislation or as modified by any successive legislation. Users may access this work and can make use of the information contained in accordance with the Copyright Legislation provided that the author must be properly acknowledged. Further distribution or reproduction in any format is prohibited without the prior permission of the copyright holder.en_GB
dc.description.reviewedpeer-revieweden_GB
dc.publication.titleMalta Medical Journalen_GB
Appears in Collections:MMJ, Volume 30, Issue 2
MMJ, Volume 30, Issue 2

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