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dc.contributor.authorSultana, Ronald G.-
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-30T09:14:50Z-
dc.date.available2020-03-30T09:14:50Z-
dc.date.issued1994-
dc.identifier.citationSultana, R. G. (1994). Let me dream! : transforming educational futures. Education, 5(2), 42-49.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.um.edu.mt/library/oar/handle/123456789/53284-
dc.description.abstractThe issue of underachievement in education has preoccupied educators over the past century at least. And yet, there has been little progress made in addressing the problem, to the extent that large groups of students fail to flourish intellectual in a school by environment. Moreover, whether we are looking, at the United States, Europe, or Asia the groups of students who underachieve and who drop out of the educational enterprise have a similar identify. They generally share one or more of the following aspirations: namely, they have what can be broadly called a working class background, are migrants or children of migrants, and/or come from an ethnic "minority" background. The report I will be critically engaging with in this paper, namely To Learn More than I have: The Educational Aspirations and Experiences of the Maltese in Melbourne (Terry, Borland & Adams, 1993) looks squarely in the face of these facts. reflecting on the issue as it applies to one particular group of students who underinvest in education, namely chil- dren of Maltese migrants. What I will attempt to do in this paper is to weave a narrative, drawing on the Terry et al. study as well as on my own research and experiences in education, to make sense of the lived realities of this group of people. Needless to say, this is in my ways my story, my interpretation, informed as it might be by many interaction with people and ideas. I cannot claim to represent the voices of the subjects we are considering, namely Maltese background children in Melbourne. That would not only be pretentious, but undignified. All that I can offer are some critical reflections which could be of some use to the Maltese community in Victoria as they seek to empower themselves and their children.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherUniversity of Malta. Faculty of Educationen_GB
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen_GB
dc.subjectUnderachievers -- Educationen_GB
dc.subjectUnderachievement -- Australiaen_GB
dc.subjectLearning abilityen_GB
dc.subjectImmigrants -- Australia -- Malteseen_GB
dc.subjectImmigrants -- Educationen_GB
dc.titleLet me dream! : transforming educational futuresen_GB
dc.typearticleen_GB
dc.rights.holderThe copyright of this work belongs to the author(s)/publisher. The rights of this work are as defined by the appropriate Copyright Legislation or as modified by any successive legislation. Users may access this work and can make use of the information contained in accordance with the Copyright Legislation provided that the author must be properly acknowledged. Further distribution or reproduction in any format is prohibited without the prior permission of the copyright holder.en_GB
dc.description.reviewedpeer-revieweden_GB
dc.publication.titleEducationen_GB
Appears in Collections:Education, vol. 5, no. 2
Education, vol. 5, no. 2
Scholarly Works - CenEMER
Scholarly Works - FacEduES

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