The philosophy of creativity

'In this age of specialisation, finding a niche is key to most people’s career progression. But it is not the only way. Cassi Camilleri sits down with philosopher poet Prof. Joe Friggieri to gain insight into his creative process.

Friggieri balances between two worlds: the academic and the creative.

His series Nisġa tal-Ħsieb, the first history of philosophy in Maltese, is compulsory reading for philosophy students around the island. His collections of poetry and short stories have seen him win the National Literary Prize three times.

"I can’t stop being a philosopher when I’m writing a short story or play. Readers and critics of my work have pointed that out in their reactions," he says. "I do not necessarily set out to make a philosophical point in my output as a poet, short-story writer, or playwright, but that kind of work can still raise philosophical issues. Dealing with matters of great human interest— such as love or the lack of it, happiness, joy and sorrow, the fragility of human relations, otherness, and so on—in a language that is markedly different from the one used in the philosophical analysis of such topics can still contribute to that analysis by creating or imagining situations that are close to the experiences of real human beings," Friggieri illustrates.'

THINK 24


Read all about this on THINK — UM's research magazine.


https://www.um.edu.mt/research/thephilosophyofcreativity