Study-Unit Description

Study-Unit Description


CODE HST3025

 
TITLE Trans-Regional Migrations: A Short History of Migration and Mobility from Ancient to Modern Times

 
LEVEL 03 - Years 2, 3, 4 in Modular Undergraduate Course

 
ECTS CREDITS 4

 
DEPARTMENT History

 
DESCRIPTION In this study-unit, migration and human mobility will be studied through the domain of history, which tends to use a different metric from the one used in the social sciences. An overarching historical view will be applied to explain the different notions of mobility throughout the past three thousand years. The course will be based on the fundamental work on this subject, which is Massimo Levi-Bacci’s work, A Short History of Migration.

The study-unit will start by analysing migration from the times of the the emergence of the Homo Sapiens Sapiens. He was a product of early mobility.

It will move on to explain mobility in the Mediterranean World during the classical age. It explains that the emergence of new civilizations, in particular, Christianity and Islam are a product of mobility. Finally, these two religions saw (and still see themselves) as missionaries. Yet, other cultures, in particular those in the East will not be neglected. China in the Far East and the Mongol Empire were based on their ability of quick mobility. The discovery of America in Early Modern Times is a confirmation of the triumph of Western Europe’s ability to dominate the seas. Dominating the seas meant conquering the latest technology that permitted fast movement. With nineteenth-century industrialization and Western Colonialism, population movement reached new proportions that will end up changing the world and set her on the way of globalization. The course will end with an overview of the current European situation towards migration and what the history of transoceanic emigrations teaches with regards to modern migratory flows. It will conclude with an educated guess of what Europe is to expect in this particular area over the next thirty years.

Study-Unit Aims:

The scope for studying movements of population are to help the student understand better the themes of migration, mobility and displacement of people. Students will be exposed to related recurrent themes such as those of internal relocations and the effects of conquest and 're-conquest' on population growth.

Another aim of this study is to evaluate the impact that people on the move had on the environment and the challenges of population growth. Immigration was one of the causes for over population and rapid urbanization.

Movements of people give rise to a large number of questions of social, economic and cultural nature. With such knowledge, students will be better equipped to promote a unified analytical approach to the problems related to contemporary issues of migration and mobility.

Learning Outcomes:

1. Knowledge & Understanding:

By the end of the study-unit the student will be able to:
- understand better the complex questions related to movements of people;
- understand the historical complexities related to the transfer of people from one place to another and the social, economic and cultural problems resulting from such transfer;
- acknowledge that migratory processes are also a source of cultural wealth.

2. Skills:

By the end of the study-unit the student will be able to:
- promote a unified analytical approach to the problems related to contemporary issues of migration and mobility;
- answer questions of a social, economic and cultural nature;
- speak about the differences and interrelationships existing between the concept of migration and mobility, how the semantic meaning of these two words evolved over the centuries.

Main Text/s and any supplementary readings:

Main Texts:
- David Abulafia, The Great Sea: A Human History of the Mediterranean, Oxford University Press; Reprint edition (September 1, 2013).
- Massimo Livi-Bacci, A Short History of Migration, Polity 2012.
- Simon Schama Patriots and Liberators, Revolution in the Netherlands, 1780-1813, Harper Perrenial, 1998.
- Simon Schama, Landscape and Memory, Harper Perennial, reprint 2004.
- http://www.mah.se/upload/forskningscentrum/mim/wb/wb%203.12.pdf

Supplementary Readings:
- Jean Pierre Poussou, Migration et Mobilite de la Population en Europe a l'Epoque moderne, in Historie des Populations de l'Europe, Vol. 1, Des Origines aux premices de la revolution demographique, ed. Jean-Pierre Bardet and Jacques Dupaquer, Fayard, 1997, pp. 262-288.
- Ruba Salih, “The Gender of Modernity. Narratives of Muslim and Islamist Migrant Women”, Journal of Mediterranean Studies, Vol. 12, No. 1, 2002, pp. 147-168.
- Nancybeth Jackson, Mediterranean Migrations and Arab-American Stereotypes, Journal of Mediterranean Studies, Vol. 11, No. 1, 2001. pp. 103-114.
- Yves Libert & Françoise Bartiaux, Le Stèrèotype et La Vie en Ghetto Facilitent-ils l’Adaptation du Migrant? L’Exemple du Bassin Mèditerraneen, Journal of Mediterranean Studies, Vol. 11, No. 1, 2001. pp. 135-158.
- Mustapha Nasroui, L’Image de la Culture Arabo-Musulmane et l’Intégration de l’Immigré Maghrebin en Europe, Journal of Mediterranean Studies, Vol. 11, No. 1, 2001, pp. 215-224.
- Martin Goodman, Jews and Judaism in the Mediterranean Diaspora in the Late – Roman Period: The Limitations of Evidence. Journal of Mediterranean Studies, Vol 4. Number 2, 1994, pp. 208- 224.
- Spatial mobility of Seafarers in the Mediterranean: A Case Study based on Status Liberi Documentation (1581-1640), Journal of Mediterranean Studies, Vol. 12, Number 2, 2002, pp. 385-410.
- Judith Okely, Hybridity, Birthplace and Naming, Journal of Mediterranean Studies, Vol. 13, Number 1, 2003, pp.1- 21.
- Jordi Ibarz Gelabert ‘Migration in the Formation of the Labour Market in the Barcelona Docks (1910-1947) Journal of Mediterranean Studies, Volume 19, Number 2, 2010, pp. 271-294.
- Malcolm Barber, Moving Cathars: The Italian Connection in the Thirteenth Century, Journal of Mediterranean Studies, Volume 10, No 1 & 2, 2000, pp. 5-20.
- David Braund, The Movement of Scythian Nomads Nuancing ‘Otherness’, Journal of Mediterranean Studies, Vol. 10, No 1 & 2, 2000, pp. 21-30.
- Peter Burke, Seaports in Early Modern Europe. Notes for a Model, Journal of Mediterranean Studies, Vol. 10, No 1 & 2, 2000, pp. 223-228.
- Russell King ‘Mediterranean Homelands’: Transnational Perspectives on Contuining the Migratory Tradition across Generations’, Journal of Mediterranean Studies Vol. 20, Number 1, 2011, pp. 185-206.
- Lauro Osos Tortoises and Elephants in the Contexts of Family Social Mobility: Second-Generation Spanish Migrants in France and their Desire to ‘Return”, Journal of Mediterranean Studies Vol. 20, Number 1, 2011, pp. 207-230.
- Joāo Sardinha, ‘Returning’ Second-Generation Portuguese-Canadians and Portuguese-French: Motivations and Senses of Belonging, Journal of Mediterranean Studies Vol. 20, Number 1, 2011, pp. 207 - 230.
- Loretta Baldassar, Italian Migrants in Australia and their Relationship to Italy: Return Visits, Transnational Caregiving and the Second Generation, Journal of Mediterranean Studies Vol. 20, Number 1, 2011, pp. 255-282.
- Anastasia Christou and Russell King, Gendering Counter-Diasporic Migration: Second-Generation Greek-Americans and Greek-Germans Narrate their ‘Homecoming to Greece”, Journal of Mediterranean Studies Vol. 20, Number 1, 2011, pp. 283- 314.
- Janine Teerling, The ‘Return’ of British-Born Turkish Cypriots to Cyprus: Narratives of a Fractured Homeland, Journal of Mediterranean Studies Vol. 20, Number 1, 2011, pp. 315- 342.
- Zana Vathi, A Context Issue? Comparing the Attitude Towards Return of the Albanian First and Second Generation in Europe, Journal of Mediterranean Studies Vol. 20, Number 1, 2011, pp. 343-364.
- Tineke Fokkema, ‘Return’ Migration Intentions among Second-Generation Turks in Europe: The Effect of Integration and Transnationalism in a Cross-National Perspective. Journal of Mediterranean Studies Vol. 20, Number 1, 2011, pp. 365. – 388.
- Evangelia Kindinger, Of Dópia and Xéni: Strategies of Belonging in Greek-American Return Narratives, Journal of Mediterranean Studies Vol. 20, Number 1, 2011, pp. 389-415.

 
STUDY-UNIT TYPE Fieldwork, Lectures and Tutorials

 
METHOD OF ASSESSMENT
Assessment Component/s Resit Availability Weighting
Fieldwork Yes 40%
Assignment Yes 60%

 
LECTURER/S Simon Mercieca

 
The University makes every effort to ensure that the published Courses Plans, Programmes of Study and Study-Unit information are complete and up-to-date at the time of publication. The University reserves the right to make changes in case errors are detected after publication.
The availability of optional units may be subject to timetabling constraints.
Units not attracting a sufficient number of registrations may be withdrawn without notice.
It should be noted that all the information in the description above applies to study-units available during the academic year 2020/1. It may be subject to change in subsequent years.

https://www.um.edu.mt/course/studyunit