Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.um.edu.mt/library/oar/handle/123456789/48498
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-07T14:12:55Z-
dc.date.available2019-11-07T14:12:55Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationWebb, M. (2019). Cyborgs and avatars in posthuman young adult fiction (Bachelor's dissertation).en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.um.edu.mt/library/oar/handle/123456789/48498-
dc.descriptionB.A.(HONS)ENGLISHen_GB
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation questions how the technologically mediated body in recent young adult dystopian fiction may provide an alternative to the hegemonic discourse of the female body. The first chapter serves as an outline of critical posthumanism as a deconstruction of humanist dichotomies and establishes dystopian young adult fiction’s didacticism and challenging of hierarchies. This genre, therefore, renders itself particularly amenable to posthuman theory. The second chapter outlines how the deconstruction of the mind/body dualism is particularly relevant to feminism due to the female’s relegation to the inferior realm of the body, as opposed to the superior realm of the mind. Donna Haraway’s cyborg figures and Katherine Hayles’s theories on embodiment are considered as challenges to this dualism. The third chapter explores the material conception of the posthuman body by close reading Marissa Meyer’s Cinder with reference to Haraway. This is in order to question whether Cinder’s cyborgian body disrupts the femininity the Perrault-Grimm-Disney Cinderella exudes. The fourth chapter explores the virtual conception of the posthuman body, which is the avatar, by close reading Cory Doctorow’s ‘Anda’s Game’ with reference to Hayles. This is in order to question whether Anda’s ties between her obese corporeal body and her active and fit avatar disrupt the discourse surrounding the female body, particularly in relation to being a girl gamer. Ultimately, this dissertation suggests that there may be a trend within recent young adult dystopian fiction where technology is being depicted to have the liberatory potential to offer alternatives to the discourses which ascribe women’s bodies.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccessen_GB
dc.subjectYoung adult fictionen_GB
dc.subjectDystopias in literatureen_GB
dc.subjectCyborgs in literatureen_GB
dc.titleCyborgs and avatars in posthuman young adult fictionen_GB
dc.typebachelorThesisen_GB
dc.rights.holderThe copyright of this work belongs to the author(s)/publisher. The rights of this work are as defined by the appropriate Copyright Legislation or as modified by any successive legislation. Users may access this work and can make use of the information contained in accordance with the Copyright Legislation provided that the author must be properly acknowledged. Further distribution or reproduction in any format is prohibited without the prior permission of the copyright holder.en_GB
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Maltaen_GB
dc.publisher.departmentFaculty of Arts. Department of Englishen_GB
dc.description.reviewedN/Aen_GB
dc.contributor.creatorWebb, Maria-
Appears in Collections:Dissertations - FacArt - 2019
Dissertations - FacArtEng - 2019

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
19BAENG027.pdf
  Restricted Access
842.55 kBAdobe PDFView/Open Request a copy


Items in OAR@UM are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.