Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.um.edu.mt/library/oar/handle/123456789/83305
Title: Book review : The ends of empire : the last colonies revisited [Clegg]
Authors: Clegg, Peter
Keywords: Books -- Reviews
Colonies -- Administration
Imperialism
Sovereignty
Issue Date: 2021-11
Publisher: University of Malta. Islands and Small States Institute
Citation: Clegg, P. (2021). Book review : The ends of empire : the last colonies revisited. Small States & Territories, 4(2), 385-386.
Abstract: John Connell and Robert Aldrich have been key figures in the academic literature on ‘Overseas Territories’ for decades. Their book The last colonies (1998) was a significant publication, not only in terms of providing a definitive review of these territories as they stood at that time, but also as an inspiration for other scholars to take up the mantle. As Connell and Aldrich note in their preface to the present volume, they argued back in 1998 that “‘the last colonies’ deserved more attention, not only for their innate historical and cultural interest but for the commercial, political and military stakes they represented” (p. v). If the 52-page bibliography is anything to go by, the authors have been successful in inspiring new scholars from across the globe to consider these territories that have often been described pejoratively as ‘confetti of empire’, ‘the last pink bits’, or ‘remnants and debris’. Through the 500-odd pages of their new book, Connell and Aldrich give, as one might expect, due regard to the territories and how they have developed and been shaped and buffeted by both internal and external events and forces. Indeed, a great deal has happened to them over the last two decades, including constitutional change, significant inward and outward population flows, and internal civil strife; all within the context of notable external events such as 9/11, the global financial crisis, climate change, and most recently Covid-19. But importantly, Connell and Aldrich do not frame the Overseas Territories as victims, but rather as robust and pro-active actors in the global system. [excerpt]
URI: https://www.um.edu.mt/library/oar/handle/123456789/83305
Appears in Collections:SST Vol. 4, No. 2, November 2021

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