Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.um.edu.mt/library/oar/handle/123456789/76529
Title: Editorial [International Journal of Emotional Education, 13(1)]
Authors: Cooper, Paul
Cefai, Carmel
Keywords: Editorials
Affective education
Social learning
Emotional intelligence
Issue Date: 2021-04
Publisher: University of Malta. Centre for Resilience & Socio-Emotional Health
Citation: Cooper, P., & Cefai, C. (2021). Editorial. International Journal of Emotional Education, 13(1), 1-2.
Abstract: The rise of social and emotional education has led to a healthy, engaging debate on the role of the relational and emotional dimensions in education. As a growing body of research evidence has consistently underlined the positive social, emotional and academic effects of social and emotional education (eg. Durlak et al, 2011), various authors (eg. Ecclestone, 2007) have raised a number of concerns pertaining to avoidable hidden dangers which may accompany social-emotional interventions and that implementers need to be alert to, in order to ameliorate negative effects. These include: the potential stigmatizing and pathologizing effects of the focus on emotional vulnerability and individual psychopathology, and the concomitant risks of imposing cultural conformity and misusing interventions for the purposes of social control. In the first paper in this edition, Akamatsu and Gherghel (Japan) contribute to this debate between the ‘bright’ and ‘dark’ side of social and emotional education, positioning empathy as a buffer against the ‘dark side’ of social and emotional education. They argue how the positive impacts of social support, prosocial behaviour, and subjective wellness may be undermined by manipulative or controlling motives unless empathy is given a key role in the delivery of social and emotional education. [excerpt]
URI: https://www.um.edu.mt/library/oar/handle/123456789/76529
Appears in Collections:IJEE, Volume 13 Issue 1

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