Prof. James Sater

Prof. James Sater

Prof. James Sater

 M.A.,Ph.D.(Dunelm)
James N. Sater is Associate Professor at the Department of International Relations. He previously held full time positions in the International Studies Department at the American University of Sharjah in the United Arab Emirates (2008-2018), as well as in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at Al Akhawayn University in Morocco (2005-2008). He was also a Guest Professor of Middle East Studies at the University of Southern Denmark (2012-13) as well as a Guest Professor of Gender Studies at the University of Southern Maine (2012). He is the author of Morocco: Challenges to Tradition and Modernity (Routledge 2010/16); and Civil Society and Political Change in Morocco (Routledge, 2007). His research interests include sectarianism, citizenship, electoral politics, gender, marginalization and migration with a focus on North Africa and Arab Gulf monarchies. Recent articles include “Drafting Tunisia’s Constitution: Tensions between Constituent Power and Constituted Power in the Transition Process,” Al Sabah Paper Series (University of Durham 2018); “Patronage and Democratic Citizenship in Morocco” in The Crisis of Citizenship in the Arab World (Brill 2017); and “Citizenship and Migration in Arab Gulf Monarchies” Citizenship Studies, 18 (3/4) 2014.
  • Middle East
  • North Africa
  • Political Science
  • Political Economy

SATER, J., 2017. ‘Migration and the marginality of citizenship in the Arab Gulf region: Human Security and High Modernist Tendencies'. In: NILS BUTENSCHON AND ROEL MEJJER, ed, The Crisis of Citizenship in the Arab World. Leiden: Brill, pp. 224-245.

SATER, J., 2017. ‘Patronage and Democratic Citizenship in Morocco’. In: N. BUTENSCHON and R. MEJJER, eds, The Crisis of Citizenship in the Arab World. Leiden: Brill, pp. 149-174.

SATER, J., 2017. Drafting Tunisia’s Constitution: Tensions between Constituent Power and Constituted Power in the Transition Process.

SATER, J., 2016. Morocco: Challenges to Tradition and Modernity, 2nd Edition. New York and Abingdon: Routledge.

SATER, J., 2015. 'Constitutionalism and Transitions in North Africa. Analysing conflicts between legal and extra-legal sources of constitutional rights’. London School of Economics – Challenges to Citizenship in North Africa and the Middle East Region. Collected Papers, 2(April), pp. 36-53.

SATER, J., 2014. Citizenship and Migration in Arab Gulf Monarchies. Citizenship Studies, 18(3/4),.

SATER, J., 2013. ‘Civil Society in the Maghreb. Lessons from the Arab Spring’. In: E. OBADARE, ed, Handbook on Civil Society in Africa. New York: Springer, pp. 95- 108.

SATER, J., 2013. Citizenship and Migration in Arab Gulf Monarchies. In: P. SEEBERG and Z. EYADAT, eds, Migration, Security and Citizenship in the Middle East. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 27-43.

SATER, J., 2013. Migrant Workers, Labor Rights, and Governance in Middle Income Countries. The Case of Migrant Domestic Workers in Lebanon. In: P. SEEBERG and Z. EYADAT, eds, Migration, Security and Citizenship in the Middle East. Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan, pp. 115-136.

SATER, J., 2012. Democratization and the Arab Spring in Morocco. Orient: Special Issue on Islam in Africa, 53(1), pp. 30- 37.

SATER, J., 2012. New Wine in Old Bottles: Political Parties under Mohamed VI. In: B. MADDY-WEITZMAN and D. ZISENWINE, eds, Contemporary Morocco: State, Politics, and Society under Mohamed V. Abingdon and New York: Routledge, pp. 9-23.

SATER, J., 2012. Reserve Seats, Patriarchy and Patronage in Morocco. In: J. PISCOPO, ed, The Impact of Gender Quotas. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 72-87.

SATER, J., 2010. Morocco: Challenges to Tradition and Modernity. New York and Abingdon: Routledge.

SATER, J., 2009. Elections and Authoritarian Rule in Morocco. Middle East Journal, 63(3), pp. 381-400.

SATER, J., 2009. Reforming the Rule of Law in Morocco: Multiple Meanings and Problematic Realities. Mediterranean Politics, 13(2), pp. 181-193.

SATER, J., 2008. Morocco’s Autonomy Proposal and the Western Sahara Conflict. Middle East Institute, Viewpoint Series, (March),.

SATER, J., 2007. Changing Politics from Below? Women Parliamentarians in Morocco. Democratization, 14(4), pp. 732-742.

SATER, J., 2007. Civil Society and Political Change in Morocco. New York and Abingdon: Routledge.

SATER, J., 2007. War on Terror: Responses from Morocco’s Civil Society. ACAS Bulletin, North Africa in the Vortex of the 'War on Terror' Ed. by n Jesse Benjamin and Fouzi Slisi, 77.

SATER, J., 2004. Human Rights in Moroccan Politics. Mediterranean Journal of Human Rights, 8(1), pp. 275-295.

SATER, J., 2003. Morocco after the parliamentary elections 2002. Mediterranean Politics, 8(1), pp. 135-142.

SATER, J., 2002. Civil Society, Political Change and the Private Sector in Morocco: The Case of the Employer’s Federation CGEM. Mediterranean Politics, 7(2), pp. 13-29.

SATER, J., 2002. State and Civil Society in Morocco. Journal of North African Studies, 7(3), pp. 101-118.

MEIJER, R., SATER, J. and BABBAR, Z., eds, Forthcoming. The Routledge Handbook of Citizenship in the Middle East. New York and Abingdon: Routledge.

  • IRL2066 - Religion and Secularism in International Relations
  • IRL2082 - Research Methods
  • IRL3007 - War and Peace in the Middle East
  • IRL3049 - Applying International Relations: Skills and Practices
  • IRL3189 - International Political Economy 1
  • IRL5061 - Methodology and Research Methods in Humanitarian Studies
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